A Great End To STEAM’s School Year

If you attended STEAM’s end of year Student Showcase, you may have seen artwork, sculpture, robots, creative stories, informational displays, comics, and more. STEAM students each decked out their personal display areas with favorite creations from the 2018-2019 school year and it looked something like this:

I was able to interview several students at the Student Showcase and find out the answer to this question:

What was your favorite thing about STEAM School this year?

I told them it could be ANYTHING, and here were some of the responses:

“Baking sugar cookies.”

“The forts!”

“Comics”

“Coding and Robotics class.”

“Making boats out of cardboard and duct tape.”

“Swinging in the hammock.”

“Science…and all the nature!”

“Programming with Lego WeDo”

“Making the yearbook.”

“Having lunch and being with my friends.”

and

“Everything!”

Have a great summer and we’ll see you in September!

How does your garden grow?

Our home garden is planted!

I’m no expert, but I am learning along the way. The kids helped me dig, till, weed, create rows and plant seeds. We ended up starting cherry tomatoes and bell peppers inside. The cats have gotten into them a few times, but I’m hopeful several seedlings will survive.
We planted mostly cold season vegetables, but I did take a risk and put some potatoes and corn in the ground early. Fingers crossed we don’t get a hard frost. If we lose the plants, I’ll try again later. 

Our garden

  • Corn
  • Cucumber
  • Carrots
  • Basil
  • Oregano
  • Thyme
  • Peas
  • Broccoli
  • Kale
  • Lettuce
  • Beets
  • Cabbage
  • Potatoes
  • Raspberries
  • Blueberry
  • Flowers

This is the only broccoli to grow so far. I think it’s broccoli!

Potatoes require hilling every two weeks to keep the new potatoes covered and prevent them from becoming green from too much sun. Thank you internet!

Our indoor peppers are growing well.

This oregano survived two winters and is continuing to produce well. I’ve been drying my own and it tastes great.

Engineering for kids

If at first you don’t succeed, try, try, try again!

At the STEAM school, we will use the design process to solve real problems. Check out this great resource from PBS Kids on how to teach kids to use the design process (page 2). The most important aspect of design thinking is that there is no single “correct” solution, rather a series of attempts, redesigns and retests along the bumpy road toward an awesome product. This type of thinking encourages kids to continue trying new approaches until they have a great solution.

When kids use design thinking, it builds their resilience, persistence, diligence and confidence!

http://www-tc.pbskids.org/designsquad/pdf/parentseducators/DS_Act_Guide_complete.pdf